Schnauzers are the Best!

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The Miniature Schnauzer dog breed has it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that’s twice as big as their bodies. Throw in that walrus mustache and quivering enthusiasm, and they’ll make you laugh every day.
Although these are purebred dogs, you may still find them in shelters and rescues. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if this is the breed for you.
With a Miniature Schnauzer in the house, you’ll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. They’ve got personality-plus, and whether they’re bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you’ll never be bored with one of these pups around. Just make sure you can give them plenty of exercise to keep up with their high energy!
DogTime recommends this carrier for traveling with your small Schnauzer buddy. You should also pick up this dog fetch toy to help burn off your pup’s high energy!
See all Miniature Schnauzer dog breed facts and characteristics below!
Miniature Schnauzer Dog Breed Pictures
Miniature Schnauzer Dog Breed Information, Pictures, Characteristics & Facts – Dogtime
Miniature Schnauzer Dogs And PuppiesMiniature Schnauzer Dogs And PuppiesMiniature Schnauzer
The Miniature Schnauzer is a small dog with a whole lot of heart. He’s always in the top 20 most popular breeds in the U.S., England, and Germany, but he’s bred around the world. He is a “people person” all the way: extroverted with moderately high energy, he just wants to have fun. And being with you is fun, no matter what you do. He’s incredibly loyal to his family — and he requires a great deal of attention.
He’s got a long beard and bushy eyebrows, and he’s a handful. Developed as a ratter, he may look just like a smaller version of the Standard and Giant Schnauzers, but he’s a distinct breed of his own. He isn’t used much as a ratter any longer (although the instinct is still there), but he still has the lively, mischievous personality.
He likes to be in the center of the action. He’s fairly good with children and he’s energetic, with a lot of terrier spunkiness. The problem is, he has no clue how small he is, and he’s likely to talk trash to a much larger dog without any concept of the consequences. That swagger of his can get him in trouble, so it’s up to you to keep him in line.
Even though he’s small, don’t mistake your Miniature Schnauzer for a toy breed. This boy is not delicate.
Because of his size, he can be a good city dog, but he needs daily exercise. After all, he’s a terrier! He needs to move. A Miniature Schnauzer also enjoys larger quarters and is great with suburban or farm families (and there might be some rats out there he can take care of for you). He adapts well to any climate, but he can gain weight quickly if he’s not exercised or fed properly.
He’s protective of the people he loves and is often suspicious of strangers, until you let him know they’re welcome. He’s an excellent watchdog, sometimes to your frustration, and will alert you to visitors, burglars, and blowing branches. His bark can be piercing. No Golden Retriever, he won’t be licking the burglar in welcome; he’ll be making sure you understand the gravity of the situation at full volume.
A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent and learns quickly. Bored during rainy weather? Teach your Schnauzer tricks — he’s a great tricks dog. Smart enough to learn anything, he excels at feats that involve jumping on his sturdy little legs.
At the same time, he can be stubborn. Really stubborn. Dug-into-the-sand stubborn. His favorite way of rebelling is to pretend that he doesn’t hear you (“La, la, la, I can’t heeear you!”) when you try to make him do something. To maintain order in your household, you must be in charge. If you let him get by with something even one time, he’ll remember it forever and you’ll find the behavior escalating. This is one of the downsides of living with a dog who might possibly be smarter than you are.
But because he can be trained so easily (one of the upsides of that native intelligence), he tends to do well in obedience and agility competitions. Miniature Schnauzers also participate in earthdog trials and often excel at them. After all, digging is what they were bred to do. That also means you can expect the occasional decapitated rodent on your doorstep. Unlike a cat’s offering, this is not a love gift but spoils going to the warrior who nailed the beast.
Historically, Miniature Schnauzer ears were cropped for cosmetic purposes. Americans are moving away from cropping dogs in general, as more people come to feel it’s not worth it for purely cosmetic reasons (unlike tail docking, which prevents tail injuries while out in the field).
However, most but not all Miniature Schnauzers who compete in dog shows still have cropped ears. Some breeders won’t crop the ears of pet-quality dogs who will never go into the conformation ring. If you are in contact with the breeder early enough in the process, you can probably make your own decision about cropping your Miniature Schnauzer’s ears.
Robust in body and mind, the Miniature Schnauzer is a lively, feisty, smart, happy, vocal, affectionate, low-shedding dog. He makes a fine addition to an active family.
Highlights
The Miniature Schnauzer is people-oriented and wants nothing more than to hang out with you. He’s incredibly affectionate.
A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent, mischievous, and often stubborn. He’s full of life.
He’s low-shedding, but high-maintenance in terms of grooming. He needs to be clipped every five to eight weeks or so.
He’s noisy. Protective of home and family, he’ll bark even at slight noises.
He’s good with kids and other dogs, but not to be trusted around small mammals.
Always keep your Miniature Schnauzer on a leash when you’re not in a fenced area. If he sees something and wants to chase it, he will likely ignore your calls.
A bored Miniature Schnauzer is an unhappy Miniature Schnauzer. Because he’s intelligent and energetic, he thrives on varied activities and exercise. Make sure that you give him both, or he’ll become destructive and ill-tempered.
To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
History
Miniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher, Affenpinscher, and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian. In Germany, he’s known as the Zwergschnauzer (zwerg means “dwarf”).
There aren’t any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it’s clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October 1888. In 1895, the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.
World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog’s popularity has never waned since.
One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color — but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage. Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer’s look may change again.
An interesting aside: While the Miniature Schnauzer is considered a Terrier by the AKC, the Standard Schnauzer is classified as a member of the Working group.
Size
Miniature Schnauzers are sturdy and don’t look like toy dogs by any stretch of the imagination. They are usually 12 to 14 inches tall at the shoulder. Weight ranges from 11 to 20 pounds.
Personality
A Miniature Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you’re sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he’ll want to sleep plastered to your side.
A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier — that means he’s full of himself. He’s a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what’s more, he wants to be in close physical contact. (Your lap is no longer your own.)
He’s very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he’s a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He’s not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.
As with every dog, the Miniature Schnauzer needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Miniature Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
Health
Miniature Schnauzers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Miniature Schnauzers will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed.
Cataracts: Cataracts cause opacity on the lens of the eye, resulting in poor vision. The dog’s eye(s) will have a cloudy appearance. Cataracts usually occur in old age and sometimes can be surgically removed to improve vision.
Entropion: Entropion, which is usually obvious by six months of age, causes the eyelid to roll inward, irritating or injuring the eyeball. One or both eyes can be affected. If your Schnauzer has entropion, you may notice him rubbing at his eyes. The condition can be corrected surgically.
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA): This is a family of eye diseases that involves the gradual deterioration of the retina. Early in the disease, affected dogs become night-blind; they lose sight during the day as the disease progresses. Many affected dogs adapt well to their limited or lost vision, as long as their surroundings remain the same.
Urinary Stones: These can cause your Miniature Schnauzer to start straining to urinate, pass blood in the urine, need to urinate more often than normal, and have cloudy or foul-smelling urine. While small bladder stones may pass on their own, your vet should be consulted. Dietary changes can’t get rid of existing stones, but they can prevent more stones from forming.
Myotonia Congenita: Only recently discovered in Miniature Schnauzers, this is a hereditary skeletomuscular disorder similar to muscular dystrophy. Symptoms begin when puppies are a few weeks old. Their muscles contract easily and they have prominent muscles in the shoulders and thighs. They have difficulty getting up, their coats are stiff, and they bunny-hop when running. Their tongues are enlarged and stiffen when touched, their lower jaws are peak-shaped, and they have difficulty swallowing. All breeding stock should be DNA-tested for the gene that causes it.
Von Willebrand’s Disease: Found in both dogs and humans, this is a blood disorder that affects the clotting process. An affected dog will have symptoms such as nosebleeds, bleeding gums, prolonged bleeding from surgery, prolonged bleeding during heat cycles or after whelping, and occasionally blood in the stool. This disorder is usually diagnosed between three and five years of age, and it can’t be cured. However, it can be managed with treatments that include cauterizing or suturing injuries, transfusions before surgery, and avoidance of specific medications.
Congenital Megaesophagus: This is a condition in which food and liquid are retained in the dog’s esophagus, causing him to regurgitate his food. As a result, dogs can get aspiration pneumonia or their esophagus can become obstructed. Diet can be adjusted to provide for the least regurgitation. The disease itself can’t be treated, only resulting conditions such as pneumonia; and the prognosis tends to be poor.
If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.
In Miniature Schnauzers, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
Care
The Miniature Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he’ll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Miniature Schnauzer is a good Miniature Schnauzer.
Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn’t have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn’t. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Miniature Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It’s not a jail, and he shouldn’t spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he’s sleeping at night.
Feeding
Recommended daily amount: 1/2 to 1 cup of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.
Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.
And don’t look into his soulful eyes at dinnertime if you’re a softie for a begging dog. Here’s a guy who loves his food, and he can become obese if he’s not fed properly and exercised enough.
For more on feeding your Miniature Schnauzer, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.
Coat Color And Grooming
Miniature Schnauzers are solid black, salt and pepper, black and silver, or white. A solid white Miniature Schnauzer can’t be shown in American Kennel Club shows, however, so white ones are by definition pet quality instead (which makes no difference to the dog’s temperament). Many Miniature Schnauzer fanciers dislike the white coat, feeling that if you want a white terrier you should get a West Highland White Terrier.
He has a double coat. The top coat is wiry. Since the undercoat catches the loose hair, he hardly sheds at all. Because of this, many people think he’s a perfect house dog, especially those who suffer from asthma.
Miniature Schnauzers should be groomed every five to eight weeks to keep them looking their best. Most people take their Miniature Schnauzers to professional groomers to do this, because there are some tricks to getting that beautiful Schnauzer look. You can learn to do it yourself — just expect something less than perfection the first few times, and have a sweater at the ready in case you need to cover up the flaws.
The coats of Miniature Schnauzers shown in conformation are hand-stripped, a process of removing dead hair. It’s time-consuming and not something to be tackled by novices; it’s for show dogs. Most professional groomers don’t strip but use the clippers. Using electric clippers means that the wiry top coat will disappear, which is why it’s not used on dogs shown in conformation.
Brush your Schnauzer two or three times a week so he doesn’t get matted, especially in the longer hair on his face and legs. Be sure to check his armpits, since this is a place where mats often form. It’s also a good idea to wash his beard after he eats.
Brush his teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.
Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn’t wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you’re not experienced trimming dog nails, ask a vet or groomer for pointers.
His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog’s ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don’t insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear.
Begin accustoming your Miniature Schnauzer to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.
As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.
Children And Other Pets
The Miniature Schnauzer likes hanging out with his people — he lives for it, as a matter of fact. He’s good with children, particularly if he’s raised with them. He’ll play with them and protect them and they’ll help each other burn off steam: kids and Miniature Schnauzers are a great combination.
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
A Miniature Schnauzer usually plays well with other dogs — he isn’t one of those terriers who can’t play nicely with others. He typically isn’t as aggressive toward other dogs as many other Terriers are, but he is brave and fearless around large dogs, a trait that can get him into trouble. He is large and in charge, at least in his own mind.
Small mammals such as rats and gerbils, however, aren’t good matches for the Miniature Schnauzer, who is hardwired to kill them. Training won’t change that; that’s what he’s bred for.
Rescue Groups
Miniature Schnauzers are sometimes bought without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one. These dogs may end up in need of adoption and or fostering.
American Miniature Schnauzer Club
More Info For You
Adoption
Miniature Schnauzer Dog Names
Bringing Home Your Dog
Training To Walk On-Leash
Housetraining Puppies
Feeding A Puppy
Indoor Activities For Dogs
Teaching Your Dog Tricks
How To Take Pictures Of Your Dog
Tags: dog breed, high energy, indoor, long hair, low shedding, purebread, small dog
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The Miniature Schnauzer dog breed has it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that’s twice as big as their bodies. Throw in that walrus mustache and quivering enthusiasm, and they’ll make you laugh every day.
Although these are purebred dogs, you may still find them in shelters and rescues. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if this is the breed for you.

With a Miniature Schnauzer in the house, you’ll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. They’ve got personality-plus, and whether they’re bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you’ll never be bored with one of these pups around. Just make sure you can give them plenty of exercise to keep up with their high energy!
DogTime recommends this carrier for traveling with your small Schnauzer buddy. You should also pick up this dog fetch toy to help burn off your pup’s high energy!
See all Miniature Schnauzer dog breed facts and characteristics below!
Miniature Schnauzer Dog Breed Pictures
Miniature Schnauzer Dog Breed Information, Pictures, Characteristics & Facts – DogtimeMiniature Schnauzer Dogs And PuppiesMiniature Schnauzer Dogs And PuppiesMiniature Schnauzer Dogs And PuppiesBreed Characteristics:AdaptabilityAdapts Well To Apartment Living4Good For Novice Owners3Sensitivity Level4Tolerates Being Alone5Tolerates Cold Weather4Tolerates Hot Weather4All Around FriendlinessAffectionate With Family5Kid-Friendly3Dog Friendly3Friendly Toward Strangers3Health And Grooming NeedsAmount Of Shedding2Drooling Potential1Easy To Groom2General Health3Potential For Weight Gain4Size2TrainabilityEasy To Train5Intelligence4Potential For Mouthiness2Prey Drive4Tendency To Bark Or Howl3Wanderlust Potential3Physical NeedsEnergy Level5Intensity3Exercise Needs5Potential For Playfulness4Vital Stats:Dog Breed Group:Terrier DogsHeight:13 to 14 inches tall at the shoulderWeight:11 to 20 poundsLife Span:12 to 14 yearsMore About This BreedThe Miniature Schnauzer is a small dog with a whole lot of heart. He’s always in the top 20 most popular breeds in the U.S., England, and Germany, but he’s bred around the world. He is a “people person” all the way: extroverted with moderately high energy, he just wants to have fun. And being with you is fun, no matter what you do. He’s incredibly loyal to his family — and he requires a great deal of attention.
He’s got a long beard and bushy eyebrows, and he’s a handful. Developed as a ratter, he may look just like a smaller version of the Standard and Giant Schnauzers, but he’s a distinct breed of his own. He isn’t used much as a ratter any longer (although the instinct is still there), but he still has the lively, mischievous personality.
He likes to be in the center of the action. He’s fairly good with children and he’s energetic, with a lot of terrier spunkiness. The problem is, he has no clue how small he is, and he’s likely to talk trash to a much larger dog without any concept of the consequences. That swagger of his can get him in trouble, so it’s up to you to keep him in line.
Even though he’s small, don’t mistake your Miniature Schnauzer for a toy breed. This boy is not delicate.
Because of his size, he can be a good city dog, but he needs daily exercise. After all, he’s a terrier! He needs to move. A Miniature Schnauzer also enjoys larger quarters and is great with suburban or farm families (and there might be some rats out there he can take care of for you). He adapts well to any climate, but he can gain weight quickly if he’s not exercised or fed properly.
He’s protective of the people he loves and is often suspicious of strangers, until you let him know they’re welcome. He’s an excellent watchdog, sometimes to your frustration, and will alert you to visitors, burglars, and blowing branches. His bark can be piercing. No Golden Retriever, he won’t be licking the burglar in welcome; he’ll be making sure you understand the gravity of the situation at full volume.
A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent and learns quickly. Bored during rainy weather? Teach your Schnauzer tricks — he’s a great tricks dog. Smart enough to learn anything, he excels at feats that involve jumping on his sturdy little legs.
At the same time, he can be stubborn. Really stubborn. Dug-into-the-sand stubborn. His favorite way of rebelling is to pretend that he doesn’t hear you (“La, la, la, I can’t heeear you!”) when you try to make him do something. To maintain order in your household, you must be in charge. If you let him get by with something even one time, he’ll remember it forever and you’ll find the behavior escalating. This is one of the downsides of living with a dog who might possibly be smarter than you are.
But because he can be trained so easily (one of the upsides of that native intelligence), he tends to do well in obedience and agility competitions. Miniature Schnauzers also participate in earthdog trials and often excel at them. After all, digging is what they were bred to do. That also means you can expect the occasional decapitated rodent on your doorstep. Unlike a cat’s offering, this is not a love gift but spoils going to the warrior who nailed the beast.
Historically, Miniature Schnauzer ears were cropped for cosmetic purposes. Americans are moving away from cropping dogs in general, as more people come to feel it’s not worth it for purely cosmetic reasons (unlike tail docking, which prevents tail injuries while out in the field).
However, most but not all Miniature Schnauzers who compete in dog shows still have cropped ears. Some breeders won’t crop the ears of pet-quality dogs who will never go into the conformation ring. If you are in contact with the breeder early enough in the process, you can probably make your own decision about cropping your Miniature Schnauzer’s ears.
Robust in body and mind, the Miniature Schnauzer is a lively, feisty, smart, happy, vocal, affectionate, low-shedding dog. He makes a fine addition to an active family.
HighlightsThe Miniature Schnauzer is people-oriented and wants nothing more than to hang out with you. He’s incredibly affectionate.A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent, mischievous, and often stubborn. He’s full of life.He’s low-shedding, but high-maintenance in terms of grooming. He needs to be clipped every five to eight weeks or so.He’s noisy. Protective of home and family, he’ll bark even at slight noises.He’s good with kids and other dogs, but not to be trusted around small mammals.Always keep your Miniature Schnauzer on a leash when you’re not in a fenced area. If he sees something and wants to chase it, he will likely ignore your calls.A bored Miniature Schnauzer is an unhappy Miniature Schnauzer. Because he’s intelligent and energetic, he thrives on varied activities and exercise. Make sure that you give him both, or he’ll become destructive and ill-tempered.To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.HistoryMiniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher, Affenpinscher, and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian. In Germany, he’s known as the Zwergschnauzer (zwerg means “dwarf”).
There aren’t any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it’s clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October 1888. In 1895, the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.
World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog’s popularity has never waned since.
One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color — but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage. Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer’s look may change again.
An interesting aside: While the Miniature Schnauzer is considered a Terrier by the AKC, the Standard Schnauzer is classified as a member of the Working group.
SizeMiniature Schnauzers are sturdy and don’t look like toy dogs by any stretch of the imagination. They are usually 12 to 14 inches tall at the shoulder. Weight ranges from 11 to 20 pounds.
PersonalityA Miniature Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you’re sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he’ll want to sleep plastered to your side.
A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier — that means he’s full of himself. He’s a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what’s more, he wants to be in close physical contact. (Your lap is no longer your own.)
He’s very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he’s a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He’s not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.
As with every dog, the Miniature Schnauzer needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Miniature Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
HealthMiniature Schnauzers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Miniature Schnauzers will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed.
Cataracts: Cataracts cause opacity on the lens of the eye, resulting in poor vision. The dog’s eye(s) will have a cloudy appearance. Cataracts usually occur in old age and sometimes can be surgically removed to improve vision.Entropion: Entropion, which is usually obvious by six months of age, causes the eyelid to roll inward, irritating or injuring the eyeball. One or both eyes can be affected. If your Schnauzer has entropion, you may notice him rubbing at his eyes. The condition can be corrected surgically.Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA): This is a family of eye diseases that involves the gradual deterioration of the retina. Early in the disease, affected dogs become night-blind; they lose sight during the day as the disease progresses. Many affected dogs adapt well to their limited or lost vision, as long as their surroundings remain the same.Urinary Stones: These can cause your Miniature Schnauzer to start straining to urinate, pass blood in the urine, need to urinate more often than normal, and have cloudy or foul-smelling urine. While small bladder stones may pass on their own, your vet should be consulted. Dietary changes can’t get rid of existing stones, but they can prevent more stones from forming.Myotonia Congenita: Only recently discovered in Miniature Schnauzers, this is a hereditary skeletomuscular disorder similar to muscular dystrophy. Symptoms begin when puppies are a few weeks old. Their muscles contract easily and they have prominent muscles in the shoulders and thighs. They have difficulty getting up, their coats are stiff, and they bunny-hop when running. Their tongues are enlarged and stiffen when touched, their lower jaws are peak-shaped, and they have difficulty swallowing. All breeding stock should be DNA-tested for the gene that causes it.Von Willebrand’s Disease: Found in both dogs and humans, this is a blood disorder that affects the clotting process. An affected dog will have symptoms such as nosebleeds, bleeding gums, prolonged bleeding from surgery, prolonged bleeding during heat cycles or after whelping, and occasionally blood in the stool. This disorder is usually diagnosed between three and five years of age, and it can’t be cured. However, it can be managed with treatments that include cauterizing or suturing injuries, transfusions before surgery, and avoidance of specific medications.Congenital Megaesophagus: This is a condition in which food and liquid are retained in the dog’s esophagus, causing him to regurgitate his food. As a result, dogs can get aspiration pneumonia or their esophagus can become obstructed. Diet can be adjusted to provide for the least regurgitation. The disease itself can’t be treated, only resulting conditions such as pneumonia; and the prognosis tends to be poor.If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.
In Miniature Schnauzers, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
CareThe Miniature Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he’ll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Miniature Schnauzer is a good Miniature Schnauzer.
Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn’t have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn’t. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Miniature Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It’s not a jail, and he shouldn’t spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he’s sleeping at night.
FeedingRecommended daily amount: 1/2 to 1 cup of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.
Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.
And don’t look into his soulful eyes at dinnertime if you’re a softie for a begging dog. Here’s a guy who loves his food, and he can become obese if he’s not fed properly and exercised enough.
For more on feeding your Miniature Schnauzer, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.
Coat Color And GroomingMiniature Schnauzers are solid black, salt and pepper, black and silver, or white. A solid white Miniature Schnauzer can’t be shown in American Kennel Club shows, however, so white ones are by definition pet quality instead (which makes no difference to the dog’s temperament). Many Miniature Schnauzer fanciers dislike the white coat, feeling that if you want a white terrier you should get a West Highland White Terrier.
He has a double coat. The top coat is wiry. Since the undercoat catches the loose hair, he hardly sheds at all. Because of this, many people think he’s a perfect house dog, especially those who suffer from asthma.
Miniature Schnauzers should be groomed every five to eight weeks to keep them looking their best. Most people take their Miniature Schnauzers to professional groomers to do this, because there are some tricks to getting that beautiful Schnauzer look. You can learn to do it yourself — just expect something less than perfection the first few times, and have a sweater at the ready in case you need to cover up the flaws.
The coats of Miniature Schnauzers shown in conformation are hand-stripped, a process of removing dead hair. It’s time-consuming and not something to be tackled by novices; it’s for show dogs. Most professional groomers don’t strip but use the clippers. Using electric clippers means that the wiry top coat will disappear, which is why it’s not used on dogs shown in conformation.
Brush your Schnauzer two or three times a week so he doesn’t get matted, especially in the longer hair on his face and legs. Be sure to check his armpits, since this is a place where mats often form. It’s also a good idea to wash his beard after he eats.
Brush his teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.
Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn’t wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you’re not experienced trimming dog nails, ask a vet or groomer for pointers.
His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog’s ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don’t insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear.
Begin accustoming your Miniature Schnauzer to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.
As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.
Children And Other PetsThe Miniature Schnauzer likes hanging out with his people — he lives for it, as a matter of fact. He’s good with children, particularly if he’s raised with them. He’ll play with them and protect them and they’ll help each other burn off steam: kids and Miniature Schnauzers are a great combination.
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
A Miniature Schnauzer usually plays well with other dogs — he isn’t one of those terriers who can’t play nicely with others. He typically isn’t as aggressive toward other dogs as many other Terriers are, but he is brave and fearless around large dogs, a trait that can get him into trouble. He is large and in charge, at least in his own mind.
Small mammals such as rats and gerbils, however, aren’t good matches for the Miniature Schnauzer, who is hardwired to kill them. Training won’t change that; that’s what he’s bred for.
Rescue GroupsMiniature Schnauzers are sometimes bought without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one. These dogs may end up in need of adoption and or fostering.
American Miniature Schnauzer ClubMore Info For YouAdoptionMiniature Schnauzer Dog NamesBringing Home Your DogTraining To Walk On-LeashHousetraining PuppiesFeeding A PuppyIndoor Activities For DogsTeaching Your Dog TricksHow To Take Pictures Of Your DogTags: dog breed, high energy, indoor, long hair, low shedding, purebread, small dogSHARETWEETYou Might Also LikeThese Cards Are Big on Sign-Up Bonuses, Cash Back, and MoreNerdWallet | SponsoredSan José: Cómo invertir $ 200 y obtener un segundo ingresoSan José: Cómo invertir $ 200 y obtener un segundo ingresoAprende más | SponsoredTop 10 Mac Antivirus – Do Mac Users Really Need Protection?Top 10 Mac Antivirus – Do Mac Users Really Need Protection?My Antivirus Review | SponsoredDoctors Baffled: Simple Tip Relieves Years of Joint Pain (Try Tonight)Doctors Baffled: Simple Tip Relieves Years of Joint Pain (Try Tonight)healthyday.online | SponsoredSan José: Calcule cuánto podría ganar invirtiendo 250$ en Netflix y otras acciones de crecimiento indetenibleSan José: Calcule cuánto podría ganar invirtiendo 250$ en Netflix y otras acciones de crecimiento indetenibleblue-oceanmarketing.com | SponsoredMédicos de Costa Rica Desconcertados: Nuevo e Increíble CBD Gummy (2021) Proporciona Mayor AlivioMédicos de Costa Rica Desconcertados: Nuevo e Increíble CBD Gummy (2021) Proporciona Mayor Aliviohealthyday.online | SponsoredSan José: Cómo invertir $ 200 y obtener un segundo ingresoSan José: Cómo invertir $ 200 y obtener un segundo ingresoMira cómo empezar a invertir | SponsoredThis new air conditioner with no installation necessary is selling out in Costa RicaThis new air conditioner with no installation necessary is selling out in Costa Ricacooledge.live | SponsoredIs Your Dog Afraid To Let You Out Of Their Sight? Here’s What You Should KnowIs Your Dog Afraid To Let You Out Of Their Sight? Here’s What You Should KnowIs Your Dog Afraid To Let You Out Of Their Sight? Here’s What You Should…DogtimeEl futuro de la higiene dental ya está aquíEl futuro de la higiene dental ya está aquíuSmile ProConoce los dobles de acción de estas 40 celebridades de HollywoodConoce los dobles de acción de estas 40 celebridades de…SpoilerSan José: Los autos en stock del año pasado casi se regalanSan José: Los autos en stock del año pasado casi se regalanPromoción de Autos | Enlaces Publicitarios | SponsoredReal Estate Prices in Miami Might Surprise You.Real Estate Prices in Miami Might Surprise You.Real Estate | Search Ads | SponsoredLas cocinas modulares en San José podrían ser más baratas de lo que piensasLas cocinas modulares en San José podrían ser más baratas de lo que…Cocina modular | Anuncios de búsqueda | Sponsored
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Talk to ya soon, Susan:0)     www.dreammakerspuppies.com

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16 Responses to Schnauzers are the Best!

  1. Debra Roddy says:

    I am Wanting to buy a Mini Schnauzer or a Schnauzer !!! I Live in McDonough, GA 30252 and have been wanting one for a while now and can’t find one. I LOVE DOGS and had a Cocker Spaniel,” Dusty” from 6 weeks old until he passed away at age 12 years old in 2009 and My Heart has been Broken but now I am Fully Ready for a Schnauzer !!! My sister-in law has one and I Fell in Love with Her on Thanksgiving Day 2011 and Want to Get One for Our Family. I am a 58 year old Married Female, My Husband is 59 years old and Our Daughter,age 34 yrs old and Our 13 year Old Grandaughter live with us. We are All in Agrement that We want a Schnauzer or a Mini-Schnauzer of Our Own. Do You Have Any Now? If so, My Name is Debra Roddy and my Telephone # is 678-517-2722. We Will Give Our Doggy a Wonderful Home !!!! I Prefer a Boy but a Girl would be okay also because I will be having Him or Her Spayed or Neutered when Old Enough. My Dog’s have always had all of their Shots and are placed on Heart Worm Preventative and the Flea and Tick Repellant that goes on their backs. I Beleive in Caring for My Pet as if He or She were a Child. Please let me know if You have One and how Much the Cost is.
    Thank You,
    Debra Roddy 678-519-2722 or morshayshymas@yahoo.com email addess.

    • Lyk says:

      The simplest and most huamne solution is to have a bark softening procedure done.Incorrectly called debarking it really is just a unadorned procedure done under anasthesiawhere two tiny holes are place in the vocal chords. It takes only about five minutes.What you will have to do is keep your dogs silent for a few weeks with the procedure or itwill not work.I know many responsible pet owners that do this so that their life is peaceful and that of their neighbors.This is far more huamne then yelling, screaming, spraying or doing any of the other silly things to get the dog to be silent.Here is some real information on the procedure- Q: What is debarking? A: This is a surgical procedure to reduce bandanna in the vocal chords. Some vets use a punch to take out bandanna. Other surgeons make cuts of unreliable sizes and I have heard of some using a laser. The goal of the surgery is to decrease the volume of the dog’s bark and the ability of the bark to carry over a wide area.Q: Does debarking take out the dog’s ability to bark? A: No. Debarked dogs take up again to bark. What debarking does is to decrease the volume of the bark so that it does not carry for miles around. Q: Is the surgery always successful?A: Sometimes scar bandanna forms and heavy barkers will become louder than when first debarked. The skill of the veterinarian is also a factor. Q: Is this a cruel and barbaric procedure? A: No. People with small or no experience raising naturally noisy and talkative breeds may tell you this. People with breeds like Shetland Sheepdogs (Shelties) can tell you that this procedure is unadorned and that it saves lives of dogs that might otherwise be dumped in the pound for their barking. Debarking is a more unadorned procedure than removing the uterus in spaying or removing testicles in neutering. Q: Do dogs suffer emotionally from debarking? A: It is a huge myth to suggest dogs are emotionally disturbed by debarking. Debarked dogs can bark. Even if reduced sound comes out of their mouths, they don’t seem to notice at all! Debarked dogs that are not being constantly disciplined for barking, in fact, tend to be much more pleased dogs!ADD: The vet that does bark softening procedures where I live only charges $ 150 for the procedure

    • Emilio says:

      This was a very interesting arltice. I myself have a miniature schnauzer (now a little over 1 years old) that I’ve had since he was 3 months old. We got him from a breeder who feed him organically and home made his food since the time he was born. I chose to start him on Orijen mainly from my own research on the ingredients and after advice from my friends. A month after having him I talked to a client about her schnauzer who had many health problems that required hospilization and lots of medication. She warned me about a dog food that she purchased that was very expensive, top of the line , sold at PetSmart. I, of course, cannot remember the name! I’ve been warned about Science Diet (which I believe has a formula specifically for Schnauzers) and If i were to guess which one I thought it was BLue Buffalo because the only thing I can remember is her saying something about Blue Ribbon’ or First Ribbon’. Any knowledge on a particular brand that has been feared of being harmful to shnauzers? I recently went and saw the Royal Canin for Schnauzers and was sceptical.Also, I know that for something being organic’ it should also be locally grown which Orijen is not considering it is from Canada (And i live in the South) should i switch to something more centralized to where I live or know of anyone/website who can give me some answers? In short the main reason for my concern is that he has really bad allergies that include constant Sneezing,skin dryness, coarse hair and a dull coat. I know that this may mean he is allergic to something in our home (good luck with that right?). He’s typically has always had this issue but it’s worsened (high pollen counts maybe?) but my concern is his food because I know how crucial Schnauzers diets are to their health and since they are prone to allergies and dry skin. Maybe there is something i’m missing. Could you help me out?

  2. Chesna says:

    I have a Dreammakers Schnauzer, Sophie whom I love dearly. I can’t say enough about Susan and the quality of dog she produces.
    Sophie is going to be six months old Friday. What a joy she is.

    • Willard says:

      I always look froward to your posts LOL entertaining. I agree that you really have that special ability to relate your experiences in such a funny way brings back some of my memories., plus in most instances, I can relate. I really enjoy your writing and will keep on reading. Thank you for sharing. But seriously, you let a 15lb dog punk you? too funny lol

    • Tatiana says:

      This is not a discipline issue, colrals, sprays and the like will not fix the problem; they may make the dog worried to bark and learn to associate being with you with pain, but subdue wont fix the problem. The fist step is get a well check on the dog by your vet, the advice you receive from a excellent vet will be worth every penny. Dogs bark because they are worried, nervous, bored or want concentration. If the barking stops when you pick the dog up then I would guess its concentration or bored.Take her for a nice long (more than a mile prefereably two) and vigorous walk, every day. This will get out her energy, lets her explore; and it lets her have that whole bonding pack dog experience as you and both the dogs patrol the locality. If she is poorly trained you will need a excellent collar that allows you to help teach her to walk on a leash. Teaching your dog to walk properly on a leash and obey commands is absolutely necessary for both of you to be safe.I would highly recommend a local obedience school, not only will they help you train the dog to be a better member of the household but your dog will get to interact with other dogs and you will get to interact with other local dog owners and maybe plot some dog days at a local park. Your vet can recommend the best schools in your area.

  3. Lindsay says:

    Heidi and Hersey’s babies are so cute. I have a six month old teacup chihuahua that only weighs 1 lb 12 oz. I’m wanting to find her a playmate around her size. The tiny one is perfect! I’m not able to get a new puppy just yet but if you have any tiny schnauzers like this one in the future keep me updated. My daughter absolutely loves schnauzers.

    • Elif says:

      I judge due to the hoarding and the lack of menatl stimulation, this dog likely barks out of habit (now) and it most likely started out of boredom. She is used to a pack without much human training and she has learned this from the pack. Harms can not be fixed straight away, your comment When she barks, I need to place a stop to it straight away. is not going to happen right now. It is going to take correction constantly. When she irrevocably facts out what you want and this is unacceptable I judge it will stop at smallest amount to a controllable level. I have had the same problem and recently adopted a chihuahua. I now have 4 dogs. When the chi came the volume went up along with frequency. She has been with us for about 1.5 months and irrevocably the crazy barking has stopped. But .when it starts, I say no barking! and shhhhh with finger to lips. (I have a deaf dog so this is her indicate and the others learn these signals also).You must be dillegent in your correction. Ultimately it will work out. Take this dog to all your neighbors and introduce them. Let your neighbors know the background of this dog and that you are in training. Question them to call you if the barking is bothersome so they know you are sincere in your training. Question them to be patient as this is a new addition and will take her some time to learn all the new rules and the catch on to the human pack leader.Sure hope this helps!! Be positive. Be persistant. NEVER NEVER HIT. This dog needs to know he can trust you and hitting him will only teach him you are not worthy of trust. Be gentle. This dog has never had human leadership. Make it excellent for him!

  4. Sue says:

    checking things out

    • Ramazan says:

      Excellent !! Tee mental imegas were playing in my mind as I readLoved the segue from the dog to human beings. Brilliant!! I found myself giggling out loud. You are gifted with the ability to relate storiies and events in an uniquely funny way. I know GH. Lol. Thanks for sharing. WRITE ON. !!!!Fran

    • Aslan says:

      Angelica,It was nice to hear from you and I sympathize with the cncoerns about your dog’s health. Sorry I am not much help on breed specific dog food, although there were some interesting comments by William D. Cusick in his book Canine Nutrition Revised.’ He ties breed origins with food grown in those climates as being most ideal for a specific breed. Since Schnauzers originated in Europe, maybe wurst/beef & pork, barley/grains and potatoes are most agreeable with them? Frankly, I a believe a fresh, natural food diet is best for all dogs and side with holistic veterinarians and animal nutritionists who have concluded that many of our pets health problems from allergies to cancer, stem from poor nutrition poor nutrition resulting from the preservatives found in all packaged and even store bought, so called fresh wet dog food. Mostly because of convenience, we have fed Molly kibbles from the bag. But, if we reduce the overall amount of preservatives she eats, she will undoubtedly have better health. Over the last six months I have been giving Molly about a 50-50 diet of fresh food and kibbles. I also monitor her stools to see that they are normal. I don’t know if it is because of this diet change from 100% kibbles, but she seems to be scratching less (same flea treatment regimen) and her coat is shinier than ever. When fixing fresh oatmeal for my breakfast (unsalted), I make extra for Molly. For her, I combine 3/4 cup lightly cooked oatmeal, 1 large egg, 1 tablespoon tuna fish with oil and 1/3 cup fresh frozen peas. Sometimes cooked, whole grain brown rice is substituted for the oatmeal and 1/3 cup chicken or beef meat is substituted for the tuna. She still gets high end kibbles for dinner, but which do you think she likes best? I hope this helps. Best wishes in having a healthy Schnauzer!Terry

  5. Natalie says:

    I purchased my Schnauzer from Dreammakers & while he is the light of my life & I absolutely adore him, I think you should be more careful & precise when determining size/price. I paid $800 & his estimated weight was 8-9 lbs. I understand this is an estimation, but he weighs 14 lbs & is just under a year. I have seen 14 lb schnauzers for $500 or less on your site, so I am a bit disappointed that most of my savings that summer went towards a highly inaccurate estimation. I do love love love my dog, and he is very trained, spoiled, and healthy. He was bread with quality and has been kept well with regular vet visits and groomings. I just thought I’d point that out so future customers can get a more accurate guess of how much their puppies will weigh.

    • Administrator says:

      Natalie,

      I am very sorry your pup turned out bigger than expected but it is only an estimation. They can slow down & stop growing or they can go through a growth spurt. We can only go by the size the pup is at the time of purchase. It definitely is not a science:-) But I’m glad you still love your pup & take good care of him. We just got a pup back last week that was suppose to be 10-11 lbs. & at 6 months old the pup is only 5 lbs. & she was wanting to breed her so we took her back & gave my friend a pup that will hopefully be larger for her to breed. Like I said, you just never know for sure!

  6. Kacie Bosysworth says:

    Hello,

    My name is Kacie and my husband and I are looking for me a micro/teacup Schnauzer to go with his giant Schnauzer we will be getting in a month or two, to complete our little family. I am looking for small I don’t want her to get over 9/10 lbs really. I love seeing all your sweet babies on your page and would like more info on the upcoming litter :) Thank you and God Bless

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